Trump: ICE will begin removing millions of undocumented migrants soon

President Trump. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump tweeted Monday night that Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) will begin deporting "millions" of undocumented migrants next week.

Why it matters: There have been more border arrests so far this fiscal year than in any other full fiscal year in the past decade, with close to 600,000 migrant arrests. Immigration agencies have been struggling to care of the large numbers of families and children, mostly from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. Many families are quickly released into the U.S. due to lack of space, Axios' Stef Knight notes.

By the numbers: The latest ICE figures show for the third month in a row, there were more than 100,000 border crossings — 144,278 in total.

What they're saying: Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard told a news conference last week Mexico and the U.S. had agreed to monitor migration in upcoming months, with a contingency for discussions on further asylum reforms if it was determined that individuals crossing the U.S. southern border had not been reduced.

Go deeper: Chart: How immigration levels in the U.S. have changed since 1900

Additional Stories

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios
  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5 a.m. ET: 1,017,693 — Total deaths: 53,179 — Total recoveries: 212,072Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5 a.m. ET: 245,573 — Total deaths: 6,058 — Total recoveries: 9,228Map.
  3. Public health latest: Anthony Fauci called for all states to issue stay-at-home orders.
  4. 2020 updates: Joe Biden said his team is working out the details on a coronavirus-focused call with President Trump.
  5. Tech latest: Google will provide data on where and how people are traveling around the world based on anonymous data via Google Maps.
  6. Jobs latest: Coronavirus unemployment numbers are like a natural disaster hitting every state.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

Mark Meadows considers new White House press secretary

Photos: Alyssa Farah, Defense Department; Stephanie Grisham, Alex Wong/Getty Images; Kayleigh McEnany, Scott W. Grau/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows has privately discussed bringing on Pentagon spokesperson Alyssa Farah or Trump campaign spokesperson Kayleigh McEnany as a new White House press secretary, two sources familiar with the talks tell Axios.

Why it matters: Meadows' start on Tuesday as Trump's new chief presents a chance to overhaul a press shop that's kept a low profile since President Trump ended the tradition of daily press secretary briefings.

CNN: Fauci advises all states issue stay-at-home orders

Dr. Anthony Fauci listens to President Trump speak during a briefing on April 1. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Anthony Fauci recommended on Thursday that all states across the U.S. implement stay-at-home orders, at a CNN town hall.

Why it matters: The recommendation stands in contrast to President Trump's calls for "flexibility." Nearly 4o states have issued stay-at-home orders to promote social distancing as a way to combat the novel coronavirus — but the orders vary in strictness and duration.

World coronavirus updates: Confirmed cases top 1 million

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

Novel coronavirus infections have surpassed the 1 million mark after "near exponential growth" that's reached "almost every country," World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Thursday.

The big picture: Policy responses to the global coronavirus crisis have been every-country-for-itself and — in the case of the U.S. and China — tinged with geopolitics. But, the scientific work underway to understand the virus and develop a vaccine has been globalized on an unprecedented scale.

U.S. coronavirus updates: Unemployment filings break record, death toll nears 6,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Over the past two weeks, 10 million Americans have filed for unemployment, with millions to come. The jobless hits right now are like a natural disaster striking every state at the same time.

The state of play: Payments to Americans from the $2.2 trillion stimulus package will be distributed in mid-April, but those without IRS direct deposit accounts may not receive checks until August, according to a House Ways and Means Committee memo first reported by CNN and confirmed by Axios.

Biden and Trump are working out details for a call about coronavirus

Former Vice President Joe Biden after giving remarks about the coronavirus. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Joe Biden said during a virtual fundraiser on Thursday night that his staff is working with President Trump and his team to set up a call about the coronavirus and how he can help.

The state of play: "Yesterday, the Trump administration suggested I should call the president to offer my help," Biden said, chuckling. "Well, I’m happy to hear he’ll take my call; my team's working with him to set it up."

The month coronavirus shook the world

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It’s already hard to envision the world we lived in one month ago.

Flashback: A WHO report from March 1 shows a total of 7,169 coronavirus cases outside of China, with just seven countries having recorded even a single fatality and the total death toll under 3,000, including China.

Coronavirus could hit developing countries hardest

Disinfecting in Dakar, Senegal. Photo: John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus is spreading most widely in countries that should be among the best equipped to handle it. There's no reason to expect that to remain the case.

Where things stand: 88% of new coronavirus cases confirmed on Wednesday came within the OECD club of wealthy nations, which together account for just 17% of the world's population. While that data is based on uneven and inadequate testing, Europe and North America are clearly in the eye of the storm.

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